The Daughters Break the Rules

Author: Joanna Philbin
Publisher: Poppy Books
Genre: Young Adult
Source: Kristin of Kritters Ramblings

 

Goodreads: Daughters Rule Number Six: Never talk to the press about your parents.
After leaking a story about the family business, impetuous high school freshman Carina Jurgensen is cut off by her billionaire father. Always resourceful, she fibs her way into a job as a party planner for New York’s annual Silver Snowflake Ball. But when Carina finds out that the party committee expects favors and freebies from her dad’s A-list connections, a choice must be made: Does she get real about her downgraded status, or pretend she’s still the ultimate heiress?
Best friends and fellow daughters of celebrities Lizzie Summers, Carina Jurgensen and Hudson Jones are back in Joanna Philbin’s second stylish and heartfelt Daughters novel.

Ope’s Opinion: It was really hard for me to have any sympathy or to relate to Carina or her friends.  I like to read young adult books to see if my grandkids would enjoy them.  I would not recommend them to read this strictly because these girls lives are not a good example.   

This was the second in the series.  I did not read the first one.  I was not lost and did not feel like I had missed anything.  This could be a stand alone.

I have the fourth book – The Daughters Join the Party on my shelf.  I may read it to see if it has a better story line.

 

Out Now

This is out today!

Goodreads:  It’s the winter of 1984. Twelve-year old Herbie and his two brothers—Wally and Cockroach—are enjoying the mayhem of winter break when a late Nor’easter blows through New England, trapping their quirky family in the house. The power goes out and playing Space Invaders to AC DC’s Back in Black album is suddenly silenced—forcing them to use their twisted imaginations in beating back the boredom. At a time when the brothers must overcome one fear after the next, they learn that courage is the one character trait that guarantees all others.

This hysterical coming-of-age tale is jam-packed with enough nostalgia to satisfy anyone who grew up in the ‘80s or at least had the good fortune to travel through them.

Thank you Steven for sending this to me!

 

The Library of Lost Things

Author: Laura Taylor Namey
Publisher: Inkyard Press
Genre: Young Adult
Source: Justine at Harper Collins

Goodreads:  From the moment she first learned to read, literary genius Darcy Wells has spent most of her time living in the worlds of her books. There, she can avoid the crushing reality of her mother’s hoarding and pretend her life is simply ordinary. But when a new property manager becomes more active in the upkeep of their apartment complex, the only home Darcy has ever known outside of her books suddenly hangs in the balance.

While Darcy is struggling to survive beneath the weight of her mother’s compulsive shopping, Asher Fleet, a former teen pilot with an unexpectedly shattered future, walks into the bookstore where she works…and straight into her heart. For the first time in her life, Darcy can’t seem to find the right words. Fairy tales are one thing, but real love makes her want to hide inside her carefully constructed ink-and-paper bomb shelter.

Still, after spending her whole life keeping people out, something about Asher makes Darcy want to open up. But securing her own happily-ever-after will mean she’ll need to stop hiding and start living her own truth—even if it’s messy.

Ope’s Opinion: If you are a book lover who likes to read about books and other book lovers, you will probably really enjoy this book.  Although it is a YA book, it deals with adult issues that impact Darcy ( MC ) who is a young adult. 

The relationships are all well developed, realistic and left an impression on me.  I enjoyed watching these relationships grow and mature as Darcy matures.  She has friends that are supportive and understanding, she has a grandmother who is there for her and she has a mother who loves her, but has issues.

The story began a bit slow for me and a little on the sad side, but it improved as it moved along.  Some of the flowery, descriptive writing made me loose track of where the story was going.  But I would still recommend this book to YA book lovers.

 

10 Blind Dates

Author: Ashley Elston
Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
Genre: Young Adult
Source: Book Expo 2019

Goodreads:  Sophie wants one thing for Christmas-a little freedom from her overprotective parents. So when they decide to spend Christmas in South Louisiana with her very pregnant older sister, Sophie is looking forward to some much needed private (read: make-out) time with her long-term boyfriend, Griffin. Except it turns out that Griffin wants a little freedom from their relationship. Cue devastation.

Heartbroken, Sophie flees to her grandparents’ house, where the rest of her boisterous extended family is gathered for the holiday. That’s when her nonna devises a (not so) brilliant plan: Over the next ten days, Sophie will be set up on ten different blind dates by different family members. Like her sweet cousin Sara, who sets her up with a hot guy at an exclusive underground party. Or her crazy aunt Patrice, who signs Sophie up for a lead role in a living nativity. With a boy who barely reaches her shoulder. And a screaming baby.

When Griffin turns up unexpectedly and begs for a second chance, Sophie feels more confused than ever. Because maybe, just maybe, she’s started to have feelings for someone else . . . Someone who is definitely not available.

This is going to be the worst Christmas break ever… or is it?

Ope’s Opinion: This is the kind of YA I would recommend for a young teen to read.  The characters are acting age appropriate and doing age appropriate things.  There are adults involved and they are interacting with the teens. There is very little foul language and physical relationships are appropriate for the age. 

There are ten blind dates ( obviously by the title ) – a few of them are sort of ridiculous, but it is a YA book.  The dates kept the story moving – there was much more to the story then just the dates, as a matter of fact, the dates are actually a side part of it. The whole family is involved in this story – they made it a quick, easy, fun read.

The ending is easy to see coming and perfect for this book.

Sadie

Author: Courtney Summers
Publisher: Wednesday Books
Genre: Young Adult
Source: Book Expo 2019

 

Goodreads:  A missing girl on a journey of revenge. A Serial―like podcast following the clues she’s left behind. And an ending you won’t be able to stop talking about.

Sadie hasn’t had an easy life. Growing up on her own, she’s been raising her sister Mattie in an isolated small town, trying her best to provide a normal life and keep their heads above water.

But when Mattie is found dead, Sadie’s entire world crumbles. After a somewhat botched police investigation, Sadie is determined to bring her sister’s killer to justice and hits the road following a few meager clues to find him.

When West McCray―a radio personality working on a segment about small, forgotten towns in America―overhears Sadie’s story at a local gas station, he becomes obsessed with finding the missing girl. He starts his own podcast as he tracks Sadie’s journey, trying to figure out what happened, hoping to find her before it’s too late.


Courtney Summers has written the breakout book of her career. Sadie is propulsive and harrowing and will keep you riveted until the last page.

Ope’s Opinion: This is a really hard book to read, so don’t pick it up unless you are ready to sink into a dark story that could be real and is disturbing.  It is a heartbreaking story.

I thought Courtney Summer had an interesting way of telling the story from Sadie’s perspective and from the “Girls” ( podcast ) perspective. I would suggest you know your young adult  well before you advise them about reading this one.  It will leave a lasting impression on the reader.

The ending left you at a place that felt real, but I can’t say it felt complete or satisfying.

Past Perfect Life

Author: Elizabeth Eulberg
Publisher: Bloomsbury YA
Genre: Young Adult
Source:  Book Expo 2019

Goodreads:  Small-town Wisconsin high school senior Allison Smith loves her life the way it is-spending quality time with her widowed father and her tight-knit circle of friends, including best friend Marian and maybe-more-than-friends Neil. Sure she is stressed out about college applications . . . who wouldn’t be? In a few short months, everything’s going to change, big time.
But when Ally files her applications, they send up a red flag . . . because she’s not Allison Smith. And Ally’s-make that Amanda’s-ordinary life is suddenly blown apart. Was everything before a lie? Who will she be after? And what will she do as now comes crashing down around her?

Ope’s Opinion: This book had perfect pace.  It started out sort of slow with no drama.  So you might think, why keep reading??  Well, it was how Ally’s life started out.  She was happily living with her dad, thinking all was normal until she started applying for college.  Then the pace of the book picked up and secrets were revealed…

I highly recommend this to a YA or adult reader.  It will keep their attention, the characters are realistic, the emotions are real and friendships are positive.  The only negative was the “f” word was used a couple of times – both in high stressed situations.

The ending made me see how strong Ally was ( a good example ).  She handled her situation better then some adults would.  I felt it was very positive and uplifting.

Sixteenth Summer

Author: Michelle Dalton
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Genre: Young Adult
Source:  Purchased

 

Goodreads:  Anna is dreading another tourist-filled summer on Dune Island that follows the same routine: beach, ice cream, friends, repeat. That is, until she locks eyes with Will, the gorgeous and sweet guy visiting from New York. Soon, her summer is filled with flirtatious fun as Anna falls head over heels in love.

But with every perfect afternoon, sweet kiss, and walk on the beach, Anna can’t ignore that the days are quickly growing shorter, and Will has to leave at the end of August. Anna’s never felt anything like this before, but when forever isn’t even a possibility, one summer doesn’t feel worth the promise of her heart breaking…

Ope’s Opinion:  I decided to go on my Goodreads and read the first book I added to my TBR list.  This cute young adult book popped up.  It was the perfect read for me.  I needed something light, easy and quick to read.

I really liked:  Anna ( the main character ) and Will ( her love interest ) had their families involved in the story,  Anna had a job – for her parents shop, but she did work, Will and Anna actually wanted to get to know each other – they were attracted to each other, but it wasn’t all just physical.

This isn’t a book that will  change your life, but it sure added a smile to my face.  It is one I would give to a young girl, for a summer read, to pass the time.  There isn’t a lot of drama, just summer fun.

 

The Grown Ups

Author: Robin Antalek
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks
Genre: Young Adult Fiction
Source:  Kristin of Kritters Ramblings

 

Goodreads: From the author of The Summer We Fell Apart, an evocative and emotionally resonant coming-of-age novel involving three friends that explores what it means to be happy, what it means to grow up, and how difficult it is to do both together

The summer he’s fifteen, Sam enjoys, for a few secret months, the unexpected attention of Suzie Epstein. For reasons Sam doesn’t entirely understand, he and Suzie keep their budding relationship hidden from their close knit group of friends. But as the summer ends, Sam’s world unexpectedly shatters twice: Suzie’s parents are moving to a new city to save their marriage, and his own mother has suddenly left the house, leaving Sam’s father alone to raise two sons.

Watching as her parents’ marital troubles escalate, Suzie takes on the responsibility of raising her two younger brothers and plans an early escape to college and independence. Though she thinks of Sam, she deeply misses her closest friend Bella, but makes no attempt to reconnect, embarrassed by the destructive wake of her parents as they left the only place Suzie called home. Years later, a chance meeting with Sam’s older brother will reunite her with both Sam and Bella – and force her to confront her past and her friends.

After losing Suzie, Bella finds her first real love in Sam. But Sam’s inability to commit to her or even his own future eventually drives them apart. In contrast, Bella’s old friend Suzie—and Sam’s older brother, Michael—seem to have worked it all out, leaving Bella to wonder where she went wrong.

Spanning over a decade, told in alternating voices, The Grown Ups explores the indelible bonds between friends and family and the challenges that threaten to divide them.

Ope’s Opinion:  The story line was really well done.  I liked the family drama, the characters were interesting and it was easy to read.  All the chapters are clearly  marked as to whose perspective is moving the story along. 
At times it felt like a soap opera.  Everyone was involved with someone else who had secrets they shared with someone else!  Eventually. the relationships worked themselves out.  The ending was well done, but a bit sad.
Side Note: The foul language was annoying and abundant.  At times, it seemed it was just thrown in there without making sense at all.

 

 

Maybe One Day

Author: Melissa Kantor
Publisher: HarperTeen
Genre: Young Adult
Source:  Purchased

Goodreads:  Zoe and her best friend, Olivia, have always had big plans for the future, none of which included Olivia getting sick. Still, Zoe is determined to put on a brave face and be positive for her friend.

Even when she isn’t sure what to say.

Even when Olivia misses months of school.

Even when Zoe starts falling for Calvin, Olivia’s crush.

The one thing that keeps Zoe moving forward is knowing that Olivia will beat this, and everything will go back to the way it was before. It has to. Because the alternative is too terrifying for her to even imagine.

Ope’s Opinion:   This young adult book is worth the read.  There haven’t been too many  (YA books) in my opinion lately worth my time, but this one has renewed my interest in this genre.  Melissa Kantor kept my attention the whole time, I wanted to keep reading to the very end.

I loved the relationships in this book. The friendship was at the center of the book.  The adults were involved in their children’s lives, the young adults had appropriate relationships with each other as well as with the adults.  It wasn’t all perfect and wonderful, but the emotions felt real.

Take out the “f” word and this book would have been a four and a half for me.

The Boy Most Likely To

Author: Huntley Fitzpatrick
Publisher: Dial Books
Genre: Young Adult
Source:  Purchase

 

Goodreads:  The romantic companion to My Life Next Door—great for fans of Sarah Dessen and Jenny Han. 

Tim Mason was The Boy Most Likely To find the liquor cabinet blindfolded, need a liver transplant, and drive his car into a house

Alice Garrett was The Girl Most Likely To . . . well, not date her little brother’s baggage-burdened best friend, for starters.

For Tim, it wouldn’t be smart to fall for Alice. For Alice, nothing could be scarier than falling for Tim. But Tim has never been known for making the smart choice, and Alice is starting to wonder if the “smart” choice is always the right one. When these two crash into each other, they crash hard.

Told in Tim’s and Alice’s distinctive, disarming, entirely compelling voices, this novel is for readers of The Spectacular Now, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, and Paper Towns.

Ope’s Opinion:  Wow!  This book was a huge disappointment for me.  I have read a couple of Fitzpatricks books before – one I loved and one was okay. I read young adult books in the view of passing them to my granddaughter to read.  This one has so much foul language in it, the main character ( male ) talks to girls like they are their to pleasure him, and the parents are not around.  What message does all that send to a young girl.

As I read further into the book, the parents showed up a little ( and I mean just a little at the end ) more and Tim ( main character ) had learned a few lessons and was a little (again little ) more acceptable.

This just was not a book I would want a young girl to read and think those relationships were normal and acceptable.